What is the Petition

 

Simplicity

A plebiscite election is the proven platinum standard for gaining independence.

Czechoslovakia became the Czech Republic and Slovakia after the Slovakians voted in a general election for Vladimir Meciar’s ‘Movement for a Democratic Slovakia.’ During the Brexit negotiations, both the Czech Republic and Slovakia had a say in the future relationship with the UK – not bad for so-called small nations. Other countries have become independent without the ‘permission’ of the country they were leaving.

Even if Tories in London granted permission for another referendum, we would still need to hold a plebiscite election confirming that result afterwards – perhaps why requests for a Section 30 Order for a referendum are only called a “gold standard”.

 

Why Now?

 

Urgency

During the 2014 referendum on Scottish independence, voters were told that Scotland would only stay part of Europe if we voted ‘no’ – and so we did.

At each election since then, voters in Scotland have given the SNP a majority with a mandate to deliver another referendum if our material circumstances changed – such as Scotland being taken out of the EU against our will.

This promised referendum has not been delivered because rather than pursue plebiscite in an election, Nicola Sturgeon has insisted instead that we must seek permission from Tories in London – a Section 30 Order – to decide on our future.

We have all waited for agreement between Edinburgh and London on a way forward but have instead seen Northern Ireland granted the right to remain a part of the European family while still in the UK, and for Gibraltar to be granted access to the Schengen group of nations, while still effectively governed from London. But Scotland, who voted by 2/3 majority – the biggest in the UK – to remain part of Europe, has instead been dragged out against her will by a government in London, dominated by Tories who haven’t achieved majority support in Scotland since the early Fifties.

 

But Will it Work?

 

Absolutely

As things stand just now, the morning after the Scottish elections in May, it is highly likely that the SNP will once again be given a mandate to ask for a Section 30 Order to be able to deliver on the promised referendum for independence. Boris Johnson has not only said he will refuse that request but has already received a mandate from Tory voters in England to refuse that request in the UK General Election of 2019.

If, however, the Scottish Government has been elected as a result of plebiscite election, Scotland’s newly-elected First Minister will not be going to London to request a referendum but instead telling London that mandate has been given for independence. No argument, no discussion, no pleading.

The Scottish Government will then be able to pass legislation requiring compliance with EU regulations as part of EFTA. We do not have to apply to rejoin the EU then but will immediately be able to access those markets that Tory incompetence in London has destroyed, proving not only of immediate benefit to Scotland’s producers and exporting industries but to foreign investors who wish to set-up and develop business with us.

Thanks to the precedent set by the Czech Republic and Slovakia, the EU will have to recognise that mandate – and so, eventually, will the Tories in London.

 

Why Organise This?

 

Independence

The ISP or, Independence for Scotland Party has one goal: independence for Scotland.

No magic tricks, no long-term career in parliament where representatives can accrue big pensions: the ISP is about getting independence and nothing else.

We will be standing candidates in the regional list. Our aim is to ensure that a super-majority of pro-independence MSPs is delivered in 2021 so that the people of Scotland can finally have their say on not only our nation’s future but that of our trading relationship with other European nations.

To find out how party standing candidates in the list only can benefit our demand for independence, go to our website at: isp.scot

Copyright 2020 The Independence for Scotland Party (ISP)